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Revolver Blog
Revolver at the Urban Air Market, this Saturday 10/20 in the Lower Haight!
This Saturday, October 20th, Revolver will participate in the Urban Air Market at its inaugural event in the Lower Haight. Haight Street from Webster to Pierce will be closed to auto traffic. Instead, the street will be lined with booths featuring 200+ independent designers selling clothing, accessories, jewelry, and other items. We've interviewed Danielle Cohen, director of Urban Air Market, about the event and she gave us the scoop on what it's all about. Come check it and us out!



Where did the inspiration for the Urban Air Market come from? Can you tell us what influenced you to begin developing this event?

Urban Air Market began as Capsule Design Festival under it's previous event director, Harris Rosenbloom. When I took over, I changed the name and changed the focus to sustainable design- but kept all of the great aspects of the original bi-annual year show.


I am on a mission to to provide people with fun opportunities to buy special things made by artists and designers. I guess the inspiration comes partly from the fact that I am an art and fashion lover. But I also believe that during our society's age of Walmart and mass production, we should all be thinking about our impact on the environment and our community.



Featured vendor Meg A. Meyers' home decor


What are the goals of the Urban Air Market? How many people are you hoping will attend?

Urban Air Market is a showcase to celebrate local, independent design, and it's also a great way to meet new people and an awesome place to shop. Because it's free to attend, it's always difficult to estimate how many attendees we have. Our last count was about 3,000 visitors throughout the day. 


The shopping experience of Urban Air Market is a bit more old school, like when everyone bought their shoes and soap directly from the person that made it, and their food from the farmer who grew it. People really come together as a community at the marketplace. My long term goal is that we can all get back to that with festivals and neighborhood events like ours.


 
Cute dresses by Rebe 



Fun socks: always a good look, compliments of Argoz


How have you gone about curating the vendors involved in the market?

We have an application process through our website, so a lot of time vendors find us that way. I also go around to a LOT of fashion events and take note of the ones that stand out. What's also great is that our vendors tell their friends when they had a good time and word spreads that it's a great show to participate in. 


Jewelry by Siri Hansdotter




Can you give us a few highlights of people/designers/retailers to look out? Anyone you are super excited to be working with?

Asking me to highlight my favorite vendors feels a little bit like asking me to choose my favorite child! I love the vendors that have been doing the show year after year, since it was Capsule, and I love the new vendors that launch their brand for the first time with us. 
Plimsolls and slip ons for summer casuals


Where do you see the future of the Urban Air Market headed? Is this an event you want to happen with more frequency, in different neighborhoods, etc?



We are expanding into a new neighborhood for the first time with Saturday's show in the Lower Haight and in November we will have a mini-design showcase as part of an SF Indie's DocFest, so yes things do seem to be happening with more frequency. I think with the right partnerships and the right team, I could produce Urban Air Market in multiple neighborhoods or in other cities. In 2014 it will be our 10th anniversary and I'd like to celebrate it in a BIG way.


Where did the inspiration for the Urban Air Market come from? Can you tell us what influenced you to begin developing this event?

Urban Air Market began as Capsule Design Festival under it's previous event director, Harris Rosenbloom.  When I took over, I changed the name and changed the focus to sustainable design- but kept all of the great aspects of  the original bi-annual year show.

I am on a mission to to provide people with fun opportunities to buy special things made by artists and designers. I guess the inspiration comes partly from the fact that I am an art and fashion lover.  But I also believe that during our society's age of Walmart and mass production, we should all be thinking about our impact on the environment and our community.

What are the goals of the Urban Air Market? How many people are you hoping will attend?

Urban Air Market is a showcase to celebrate local, independent design, and it's also a great way to meet new people and an awesome place to shop. Because it's free to attend, it's always difficult to estimate how many attendees we have.  Our last count was about 3,000 visitors throughout the day.  

The shopping experience of Urban Air Market is a bit more old school, like when everyone bought their shoes and soap directly from the person that made it, and their food from the farmer who grew it.  People really come together as a community at the marketplace.  My long term goal is that we can all get back to that with festivals and neighborhood events like ours.

How have you gone about curating the vendors involved in the market?

We have an application process through our website, so a lot of time vendors find us that way.  I also go around to a LOT of fashion events and take note of the ones that stand out.  What's also great is that our vendors tell their friends when they had a good time and word spreads that it's a great show to participate in. 

Can you give us a few highlights of people/designers/retailers to look out? Anyone you are super excited to be working with?

Asking me to highlight my favorite vendors feels a little bit like asking me to choose my favorite child!  I love the vendors that have been doing the show year after year, since it was Capsule, and I love the new vendors that launch their brand for the first time with us.  Some new and returning vendors at the October 20th show to look out for:

Culk Ink (screen printed tees)
Meg A. Meyers (home decor)
Rebe (dresses)
Argoz (socks)
Daily San Franciscan (jewelry)
Blu Kicks (Shoes)
Jasper Hearts Wren (kids)

*photos attached and named with associated designer/vendor

Where do you see the future of the Urban Air Market headed? Is this an event you want to happen with more frequency, in different neighborhoods, etc?

We are expanding into a new neighborhood for the first time with Saturday's show in the Lower Haight and in November we will have a mini-design showcase as part of an SF Indie's DocFest, so yes things do seem to be happening with more frequency.  I think with the right partnerships and the right team, I could produce Urban Air Market in multiple neighborhoods or in other cities. In 2014 it will be our 10th anniversary and I'd like to celebrate it in a BIG way.




Where did the inspiration for the Urban Air Market come from? Can you tell us what influenced you to begin developing this event?

Urban Air Market began as Capsule Design Festival under it's previous event director, Harris Rosenbloom.  When I took over, I changed the name and changed the focus to sustainable design- but kept all of the great aspects of  the original bi-annual year show.

I am on a mission to to provide people with fun opportunities to buy special things made by artists and designers. I guess the inspiration comes partly from the fact that I am an art and fashion lover.  But I also believe that during our society's age of Walmart and mass production, we should all be thinking about our impact on the environment and our community.

What are the goals of the Urban Air Market? How many people are you hoping will attend?

Urban Air Market is a showcase to celebrate local, independent design, and it's also a great way to meet new people and an awesome place to shop. Because it's free to attend, it's always difficult to estimate how many attendees we have.  Our last count was about 3,000 visitors throughout the day.  

The shopping experience of Urban Air Market is a bit more old school, like when everyone bought their shoes and soap directly from the person that made it, and their food from the farmer who grew it.  People really come together as a community at the marketplace.  My long term goal is that we can all get back to that with festivals and neighborhood events like ours.

How have you gone about curating the vendors involved in the market?

We have an application process through our website, so a lot of time vendors find us that way.  I also go around to a LOT of fashion events and take note of the ones that stand out.  What's also great is that our vendors tell their friends when they had a good time and word spreads that it's a great show to participate in. 

Can you give us a few highlights of people/designers/retailers to look out? Anyone you are super excited to be working with?

Asking me to highlight my favorite vendors feels a little bit like asking me to choose my favorite child!  I love the vendors that have been doing the show year after year, since it was Capsule, and I love the new vendors that launch their brand for the first time with us.  Some new and returning vendors at the October 20th show to look out for:

Culk Ink (screen printed tees)
Meg A. Meyers (home decor)
Rebe (dresses)
Argoz (socks)
Daily San Franciscan (jewelry)
Blu Kicks (Shoes)
Jasper Hearts Wren (kids)

*photos attached and named with associated designer/vendor

Where do you see the future of the Urban Air Market headed? Is this an event you want to happen with more frequency, in different neighborhoods, etc?

We are expanding into a new neighborhood for the first time with Saturday's show in the Lower Haight and in November we will have a mini-design showcase as part of an SF Indie's DocFest, so yes things do seem to be happening with more frequency.  I think with the right partnerships and the right team, I could produce Urban Air Market in multiple neighborhoods or in other cities. In 2014 it will be our 10th anniversary and I'd like to celebrate it in a BIG way.




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